JAPE NO. 56, DECEMBER 2005

SPECIAL ISSUE ON WHOSE CHOICES? ANALYSIS OF THE CURRENT INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 'REFORMS'

The industrial relations 'reforms': an introduction //

John King and Frank Stilwell

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Workchoices, myth-making at work //​

Bradon Ellem, Marian Baird, Rae Cooper and Russell D. Lansbury

Hollow shells: the alleged link between individual contracting and productivity growth //

David Peetz

The likely employment impact of removing unfair

dismissal protection //

Benoit Freyens and Paul Oslington

Workchoices, removing the choice to strike //

Chris White

Minimum wage setting and the Australian Fair Pay

Commission //

Mark Wooden

The British Low Pay Commission and the proposed Australian Fair Pay Commission //

Robyn May

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Advancing Australia Fair: The Australian Fair Pay and Conditions Standard //

Peter Waring, Alex de Ruyter and John Burgess

WorkChoices and women workers //

Barbara Pocock and Helen Masterman-Smith

Young people's attitudes to workplace bargaining //

Richard Denniss

 

Class, ideology and Australian industrial relations //

Andrew Mack

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Building unions and government 'reform': the challenge for unions //

Liz Ross

Workplace 'reform' and the restructuring of higher education //

Stuart Rosewarne

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WorkChoices, the demise of the state systems and the future for working life in Queensland //

Margaret Lee

The new industrial relations: portents for the lowly paid //

David Plowman and Alison Preston

Industrial relations: employee rights and the economy //

Greg Combet

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Resisting Howard's industrial relations 'reforms': an assessment of ACTU strategy //

Tom Bramble

Framing the debate: the union's campaign //

Neale Towart

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Industrial relations: a minimum programme for the states //

J. E. King

Curiouser and curiouser: the Federal Remuneration Tribunal //

John Lewer and Peter Waring

Setting the double standard: Chief Executive pay the BCA way //

John Shields

Any attention is bad attention: public opinion towards the Howard government's industrial relations reforms in 2005 //

Shaun Wilson